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Hanimex Camera

Hanimex 35se

The Hanimex 35se is probably the worst camera I own. It’s a plastic, low build quality, 35mm point & shoot that was made in Hong Kong. It is inflexible and takes average pictures. So why would I buy one. That’s a good question that I hope I answer in my latest video. The shutter speed is fixed at 1/250th and the aperture is a snail-like f5.6, f9.5 or f16. There is no metering or low light warning. But it does have a tripod mount, a cable release point and takes screw in 43mm filters. So it’s not all bad. It can also take some reasonable pictures.

But above all it’s fun and I love all cameras. If somebody wants to pay for this, I won’t condemn them as that’s exactly what I did.

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Olympus Camera

Olympus Trip 35 – Part 2

As a follow-up to my previous video, in this edition I explain my attempts to restore an Olympus Trip 35. This is in terms of cosmetic appearance as well as in terms of its operation. I try to follow a superb video to get the aperture blades to work properly. Later I choose to clean, re-skin and paint my newer purchase. I highly recommend Milly’s Cameras for any of your camera repair requirements.

If you enjoy the video, why not subscribe to my channel if you haven’t already?

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Olympus Camera

Olympus Trip 35 – Part 1

Another Olympus? Yes, but it’s a very good one. In this video, I talk about my 1968 Olympus Trip 35. My third Trip 35 and the best one yet. The story is a little complicated to cover in just one video and so I will add part 2, as soon as it is ready. In this part, I go through the camera’s operation and a little history behind it. Over 10,000,000 of these were sold between 1967 and 1984. Due to some nice little features and a pin-sharp lens, they are still popular today. I hope to restore mine and perhaps re-cover it as well, so look out for that next time.

In the meantime, why not subscribe to my channel if you haven’t already.

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Olympus Camera

Olympus OM-40 Program

This is the 1985 Olympus OM-40 Program. In my opinion, one of the best consumer 35mm SLR’s ever made, and a model I have been on the look out for. Three exposure modes, ESP metering and full DX film capabilities, all make it a very versatile camera and one that is already becoming my favourite to use. Unfortunately, I currently only own one OM mount lens, a 70-150mm zoom. So now I’m on the look out for a nice fast prime lens. You can read more about lenses here.

A massive thank you to everyone who interacts with my channel in any way. You’re all awesome!

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Olympus Camera

Olympus OM-101

The 1988 Olympus OM-101 Power Focus was an unusual SLR. Known as the OM-88 in many parts of the world, it was an entirely automatic camera. However, with the addition of an adaptor, it could be converted in to a manual one. My version unfortunately appears not to be working despite my efforts to clean it. Perhaps somebody can offer me some advice? In the meantime, enjoy my video where I discuss the camera and explain it’s operation.

A massive thank you to everyone who interacts with my channel in any way. You’re all awesome!

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Pentax Camera

Pentax Zoom 60

Another point & shoot this week. The Pentax Zoom 60 was made in 1987 and is a fully automatic compact camera. Automatic focusing, automatic exposure control, automatic flash, automatic film-speed setting, automatic film loading, and automatic film winding/rewinding, all make it absolutely ideal for the novice. Or indeed someone who just wants to take pictures with film and is not concerned with the “how”.

This could be a great choice for street photography as it nice and small and discreet. Or perhaps the sort of camera you might take on a trip where bulky equipment would be an inconvenience. Enjoy the video and don’t forget to give it a thumbs up!

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Roll of Film

Loading 35mm Film

A comment on a recent video of mine asked how to load 35mm film in to a camera. Without sounding conceited, I had never considered it, as I have been doing it for so long. However I am trying to help the beginner and so here is a video that explains it. I can’t cover all types of camera obviously. So I have chosen two very different ones and have tried to explain differences that you might come across.

I hope it’s of use as I might start on a series of basic “how-to” videos. Here is the link to the site for the manuals that I talk about.

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Agfa Camera

Agfa Silette II

In this week’s video I look at the 1962 Agfa Silette II. As a successor to the Silette I featured here, this 35mm has several improvements. A hot-shoe, a bright-line viewfinder, a faster lens and a nice clean action. I think that this is another contender for a cheap but very useable street photography camera. Or an ideal start for the collector of vintage cameras.

This could be a great choice for street photography as it nice and small and discreet.

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Lomo Camera

Lomo Cosmic 35

This is the 1963 Lomo Cosmic 35 or Smena 8 or Global 35, depending on where it was first sold. Normally, by the time I feature a camera here, I have owned it for a while and have done some research in order to be able to use it and tell you about it. But as I didn’t intend on buying this one, I have decided to learn along with you. Since I made the video I have started using it and so I have added some captions but I would also urge you to check out this video https://youtu.be/OSF_Xu8af9o as it explains some things in much more detail.

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Agfa Camera

Agfa Silette

The Agfa Silette has quite a complicated timeline. This is the 1957 Silette (Type 2) which is a 35mm, viewfinder camera. But there were many versions up until it was discontinued in 1973. This is well made little camera and it is very easy to use. My version has a 45mm f3.5 lens, with shutter speeds ranging from 1sec to 1/300th. I will be posting some images taken with it to the gallery soon.

Enjoy the video below and please consider subscribing for more vintage film cameras.

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