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FED Camera

FED 4

The FED 4 is a 35mm film rangefinder camera made by FED and produced between 1964-80 in present-day Ukraine. Lenses, of which there are many choices, can be changed by way of an M39 screw thread. The standard lens that was supplied was a 53mm f2.8. Shutter speeds range from 1s – 1/500s +B, with flash sync at 1/30s and a self-timer too. Although it is similar in many ways to the Zorki 4 I featured last year, the FED 4 has a a built-in selenium light-meter. This seems to be very accurate and works as well as many modern ones. There are several versions of the this camera that can be identified by small differences in looks.

My particular one is a 1979 and I have to say I love it. Prices for these are currently around £35 for a good example and they work very well indeed. If you’d like to try out rangefinder photography, you could do a lot worse. In this video I show you how to load a film, as the process is quite different to many other cameras.

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Zenit Camera

Zenit TTL

This is the 1980 Zenit TTL Olympic Edition. It is another Soviet made 35mm SLR. This one was made to commemorate the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games. Mine is in pretty grim condition but in this video I start the restoration process and hopefully I can improve its condition. I bought it from an antique dealer, fully expecting to sell it on for spares. But I have decided to keep it. The initial cleaning has gone well and I have ordered a lens that would have originally come with it. Hopefully I will be able to find a shutter speed dial and get it fully operational.

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Kodak Instamatics

Kodak Instamatic

The Kodak Instamatic was a very popular range of cameras. So popular, that the word ‘instamatic’ is still often used as a generic term for any point and shoot camera. Made from 1963 by Kodak in the US, UK and elsewhere, they were a range of inexpensive easy to use small cameras. I remember my father buying me a 133 that I practically wore out, I loved it so much. Most Instamatics used 126 film or 110 film which came in easy to load cartridges. I currently own three different models, but there were many more and so I am often on the lookout. Above you can see, from left to right, the 204 made in 1966, the 133 made in 1968 and the 77X made in 1977.

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Hanimex Camera

Hanimex 35se

The Hanimex 35se is probably the worst camera I own. It’s a plastic, low build quality, 35mm point & shoot that was made in Hong Kong. It is inflexible and takes average pictures. So why would I buy one. That’s a good question that I hope I answer in my latest video. The shutter speed is fixed at 1/250th and the aperture is a snail-like f5.6, f9.5 or f16. There is no metering or low light warning. But it does have a tripod mount, a cable release point and takes screw in 43mm filters. So it’s not all bad. It can also take some reasonable pictures.

But above all it’s fun and I love all cameras. If somebody wants to pay for this, I won’t condemn them as that’s exactly what I did.

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Olympus Camera

Olympus Trip 35 – Part 2

As a follow-up to my previous video, in this edition I explain my attempts to restore an Olympus Trip 35. This is in terms of cosmetic appearance as well as in terms of its operation. I try to follow a superb video to get the aperture blades to work properly. Later I choose to clean, re-skin and paint my newer purchase. I highly recommend Milly’s Cameras for any of your camera repair requirements.

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Olympus Camera

Olympus Trip 35 – Part 1

Another Olympus? Yes, but it’s a very good one. In this video, I talk about my 1968 Olympus Trip 35. My third Trip 35 and the best one yet. The story is a little complicated to cover in just one video and so I will add part 2, as soon as it is ready. In this part, I go through the camera’s operation and a little history behind it. Over 10,000,000 of these were sold between 1967 and 1984. Due to some nice little features and a pin-sharp lens, they are still popular today. I hope to restore mine and perhaps re-cover it as well, so look out for that next time.

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ASA settings

Pushing & Pulling Film

For my latest video, I have attempted to describe and explain what it means to “push” or “pull” your photographic film. In a nutshell, pushing and pulling is a technique of setting your camera to a different film speed than that of the film you’re using. Effectively under or over-exposing it. You might do this because the environment you’re shooting in has too little light. Or perhaps just for artistic reasons etc. Whatever your motivation, the process can be simple if you remember a few basics. Watch my video and be sure to check a much more detailed explanation found here.

Another big thank you to all my subscribers!

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Olympus Camera

Olympus OM-40 Program

This is the 1985 Olympus OM-40 Program. In my opinion, one of the best consumer 35mm SLR’s ever made, and a model I have been on the look out for. Three exposure modes, ESP metering and full DX film capabilities, all make it a very versatile camera and one that is already becoming my favourite to use. Unfortunately, I currently only own one OM mount lens, a 70-150mm zoom. So now I’m on the look out for a nice fast prime lens. You can read more about lenses here.

A massive thank you to everyone who interacts with my channel in any way. You’re all awesome!

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Olympus Camera

Olympus OM-101

The 1988 Olympus OM-101 Power Focus was an unusual SLR. Known as the OM-88 in many parts of the world, it was an entirely automatic camera. However, with the addition of an adaptor, it could be converted in to a manual one. My version unfortunately appears not to be working despite my efforts to clean it. Perhaps somebody can offer me some advice? In the meantime, enjoy my video where I discuss the camera and explain it’s operation.

A massive thank you to everyone who interacts with my channel in any way. You’re all awesome!

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Pentax Camera

Pentax Zoom 60

Another point & shoot this week. The Pentax Zoom 60 was made in 1987 and is a fully automatic compact camera. Automatic focusing, automatic exposure control, automatic flash, automatic film-speed setting, automatic film loading, and automatic film winding/rewinding, all make it absolutely ideal for the novice. Or indeed someone who just wants to take pictures with film and is not concerned with the “how”.

This could be a great choice for street photography as it nice and small and discreet. Or perhaps the sort of camera you might take on a trip where bulky equipment would be an inconvenience. Enjoy the video and don’t forget to give it a thumbs up!

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