Search for:
Hanimex Camera

Hanimex 35se

The Hanimex 35se is probably the worst camera I own. It’s a plastic, low build quality, 35mm point & shoot that was made in Hong Kong. It is inflexible and takes average pictures. So why would I buy one. That’s a good question that I hope I answer in my latest video. The shutter speed is fixed at 1/250th and the aperture is a snail-like f5.6, f9.5 or f16. There is no metering or low light warning. But it does have a tripod mount, a cable release point and takes screw in 43mm filters. So it’s not all bad. It can also take some reasonable pictures.

But above all it’s fun and I love all cameras. If somebody wants to pay for this, I won’t condemn them as that’s exactly what I did.

Related Images:

Toy Camera

Baby’s First Camera

My future grandson is not even born but already has his first camera. This wooden beauty was bought by his mum and is hopefully tough enough to stand the rigours of teething etc. I can’t wait until he’s older and I can introduce him to the joy of film. It will be coming full circle for me. My father got me in to photography in the first place and although he has since passed away, it’s his birthday today. I think of him every time I pick up a camera and it would be nice to give junior that same feeling. Until then, this is a lovely start.

Related Images:

Long Exposure Photography

Some tips on long-exposure photography in my latest video. I spent a recent holiday in Ireland and visited the Powerscourt Waterfall. Whilst there I took some photos using a neutral density filter and shutter speeds in excess of 20 seconds. I was hoping to smooth out the moving water so that it gave me that ethereal look that you often see. I had a lot of fun experimenting with settings and I’m pleased with the results.

Please take a look and consider subscribing.

Related Images:

Olympus Camera

Olympus Trip 35 – Part 2

As a follow-up to my previous video, in this edition I explain my attempts to restore an Olympus Trip 35. This is in terms of cosmetic appearance as well as in terms of its operation. I try to follow a superb video to get the aperture blades to work properly. Later I choose to clean, re-skin and paint my newer purchase. I highly recommend Milly’s Cameras for any of your camera repair requirements.

If you enjoy the video, why not subscribe to my channel if you haven’t already?

Related Images:

Olympus Camera

Olympus Trip 35 – Part 1

Another Olympus? Yes, but it’s a very good one. In this video, I talk about my 1968 Olympus Trip 35. My third Trip 35 and the best one yet. The story is a little complicated to cover in just one video and so I will add part 2, as soon as it is ready. In this part, I go through the camera’s operation and a little history behind it. Over 10,000,000 of these were sold between 1967 and 1984. Due to some nice little features and a pin-sharp lens, they are still popular today. I hope to restore mine and perhaps re-cover it as well, so look out for that next time.

In the meantime, why not subscribe to my channel if you haven’t already.

Related Images:

Walk Toward the Light

The musician Paul Weller once said that “the space between the notes was as important as the notes themselves”. I think the same can be applied to photography. In my image, Walk Toward the Light, there is a considerable amount of blank space; a dark shadow that is completely black and shows no details. This was a deliberate choice and hopefully, it helped convey a sense of loneliness. Despite already shooting in low light, I chose to under-expose slightly to ensure that the shadows became completely black. Hopefully, it worked and that it’s an image you like.

You can purchase a full-resolution digital download or a print of this image from here.

Related Images:

Lakeside Sunset

Working in the outdoors has many advantages. Perhaps the best one is the endless photo opportunities it presents. As long as I remember to pack a camera of some sort, I’m ready to capture what I see. This shot was a typical sunset. However, this time I didn’t want the usual silhouette of the trees in the foreground. So instead I metered on the foreground allowing me to expose the detail whilst maintaining good colour in the sky and clouds. This is a technique that can be a little tricky to achieve without practice and you may need to do some tweaking in post.

You can purchase a full-resolution digital download or a print of this image from here.

Related Images:

Ivy Fence

For the first of my featured image series, I have chosen “Ivy Fence”. Good composition is a tricky thing to learn. Partly because you’ll often hear conflicting opinions on what makes a good composition. My advice to you would be to look for something different. Experiment by challenging yourself to find a different point of view. This shot could have been much wider and taken in the nearby flowers etc. But I chose to focus on the contrast of the ivy and the wood grain. I don’t claim this is any better, but it’s a different take, which will help you develop a style of your own.

I hope to show you more images of mine where this is the case. Practice looking for a different angle for a shot, even when you don’t have a camera with you. Feel free to show me your examples in the comments.

You can purchase a full-resolution digital download or a print of this image from here.

Related Images:

Gallery

Featured Images

Regular visitors to this site will know that the images I create can be licenced or purchased from my shop. In addition, you can view a wider selection of my work in my gallery here. However, I thought it might be an idea to regularly feature an image and explain a little more about it. Where it was shot, what settings were used and a little background to it. These will be a low-resolution version, which will also be available, in all their glory, in the shop.

Feel free to leave a comment if you have a favourite, that you’d like me to feature.

Related Images:

ASA settings

Pushing & Pulling Film

For my latest video, I have attempted to describe and explain what it means to “push” or “pull” your photographic film. In a nutshell, pushing and pulling is a technique of setting your camera to a different film speed than that of the film you’re using. Effectively under or over-exposing it. You might do this because the environment you’re shooting in has too little light. Or perhaps just for artistic reasons etc. Whatever your motivation, the process can be simple if you remember a few basics. Watch my video and be sure to check a much more detailed explanation found here.

Another big thank you to all my subscribers!

Related Images: